Do Nothing: How to Break Away from Overworking, Overdoing, and Underliving

Do Nothing: How to Break Away from Overworking, Overdoing, and Underliving

We work feverishly to make ourselves happy. So why are we so miserable? This manifesto helps us break free of our unhealthy devotion to efficiency and shows us how to reclaim our time and humanity with a little more leisure.

Despite our constant search for new ways to "hack" our bodies and minds for peak performance, human beings are working more instead of less, living harder not smarter, and becoming more lonely and anxious. We strive for the absolute best in every aspect of our lives, ignoring what we do well naturally and reaching for a bar that keeps rising higher and higher. Why do we measure our time in terms of efficiency instead of meaning? Why can't we just take a break?

In Do Nothing, award-winning journalist Celeste Headlee illuminates a new path ahead, seeking to institute a global shift in our thinking so we can stop sabotaging our well-being, put work aside, and start living instead of doing. As it turns out, we're searching for external solutions to an internal problem. We won't find what we're searching for in punishing diets or productivity apps. Celeste's strategies will allow you to regain control over your life and break your addiction to false efficiency. You'll learn how to increase your time perception to determine how your hours are being spent, invest in quality idle time, and focus on end goals instead of mean goals. It's time to reverse the trend that's making us all sadder, sicker, and less productive, and return to a way of life that allows us to thrive.

Title:Do Nothing: How to Break Away from Overworking, Overdoing, and Underliving
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9781984824738
Format Type:

    Do Nothing: How to Break Away from Overworking, Overdoing, and Underliving Reviews

  • Milan

    Do Nothing by Celeste Headlee is surprisingly good. It is a well-researched investigation on our obsession with work and efficiency. She provided the historical context on how work evolved to what it ...

  • Yesenia Juarez

    Quite interesting, I wish I only worked 40 hours a week and I don’t even have children. Everyone should listen to this it makes your brains wheels turn. ...

  • Truce

    Do Nothing is an excellent, well-researched interrogation on our culture’s obsession with overwork and efficiency, and the ways it stifles creativity and actual productivity and leads to a lower qua...

  • Claudia Greening

    “I always take notes in longhand now, but since I love trees, I don’t use paper.” (pg. 84) This quote sums up the book for me. It felt so deeply out of touch with the lives of working class peop...

  • Mehrsa

    I had mixed feelings about this book. I agree with the message that we are overworked and that our culture is obsessed with the idea that our work is our worth (due to both puritanism and Capitalism),...

  • Janet

    This is the most perfect thing to have read during the Covid-19 pandemic. I cannot recommend it highly enough. Its simple title belies the rich, extensive research Headlee conducted as well as the sta...

  • Susie Stangland

    This was a title that grabbed my attention as I’m someone who has to always be doing something, even in my leisure time whether it’s hiking, reading, cooking or even a puzzle. So I wanted to learn...

  • Afton Mortensen

    I read this immediately following Lost Connections by Johann Hari, and it was a perfect complement. This book focuses more on work-life balance but ultimately had the same message: we become void of h...

  • Melissa

    This was a difficult read for me. I'm used to read fiction, and there is a lot of facts to assimilate in this book. It's not a bad read. It's incredibly well-researched (in neuroscience, evolutionary ...

  • Kayla Mckinney

    It isn't often you find a truly likable narrator in nonfiction - so likable that they can challenge truths you've held and still maintain your respect. Celeste Headlee is just such a narrator. In "Do ...